Indo-China Stand off-Embarrassment at The Grandest Scale

Chinese board game xiangqi is not only a game but a part of larger Chinese culture. It was considered an essential part of the training of men who aspire to rise to commanding heights in various walks of life. Kings, generals, people of letter, and high priests were expected to be well versed in this game. Xiangqi was considered to cultivate virtues like patience, forethought, resolve, and long-term planning.

To a bystander, the game may lack action and thrill but to the players and an ordinary Chinese, this is the way of life in china. Every action must be forethought in every possible detail, though trivial, to avoid changing minds midway or to face some embarrassment as a result. This habit of overthinking is visible inactions of individuals and state functionaries in every day working of Chinese.

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China’s subtle message to India

Chinese diplomacy is suave, subtle and refined. It was once defined that when a Chinese diplomat will tell you to go to hell, he will do it so politely that you will look forward to the trip. Over the years, Chinese diplomacy has not lost its finesse, except that it has become assertive.

A 2017 Chinese movie Wolf Warrior sheds light on the polite but firm nuance of Chinese diplomacy. The slogan of the movie has been borrowed from a Han Dynasty saying: “Whoever offends China will be punished, no matter how far they are.” At the end of the film, the red cover of a Chinese passport is displayed, accompanied by the message: “Citizens of the PRC: When you encounter danger in a foreign land, do not give up! Please remember, at your back stands a strong motherland.”

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